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Dogs need 11 essential amino acids that they cannot synthesize themselves and must get from their diet. Lysine is one of these 11 essential amino acids. It plays an important role in many biological functions, including the synthesis of proteins and enzymes, the absorption of calcium, and the production of hormones and antibodies.

What are amino acids?

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are involved in almost all biological processes, including cell growth and repair, metabolism, hormone production, and immune function.

There are 20 different amino acids that can be used to make proteins. Of these, 11 are considered essential because dogs cannot synthesize them on their own and must get them from their diet. The other 9 are considered non-essential because dogs can synthesize them in the body from other amino acids or nutrients.

What is Lysine:

Lysine is one of the 11 essential amino acids that dogs need in their diet. It is an important component of many proteins and enzymes and plays a role in the absorption of calcium, hormone production, and immune function.

Lysine is found in meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. It is also available in supplement form.

In 1889, Edmund Drechsel at the University of Freiburg (Germany) discovered lysine by hydrolyzing casein, a milk protein. In 1902, Emil Fischer and Fritz Weigert at the University of Berlin determined the molecule’s structure; they produced it and compared it to nature’s product. Lysine has the following advantages :

  • -Lysine is essential for growth and development
  • -Lysine helps the body absorb calcium
  • -Lysine boosts immune function
  • -Lysine aids in wound healing
  • -Lysine may help prevent cold sores

Lysine gets destroyed with the extrusion process:

In the process of manufacturing food, the use of ingredients such as meat meal, meat and bone meals(MBM), poultry or beef by-products that use the extrusion method to obtain nutrients in proteins end up destroying lysine amino acid. This is how the destruction of amino acids works.

This research found that the high temperatures used in extrusion methods destroy the essential amino acids (BCAA’s) and make them unavailable to dogs.

This is why it is important to choose a dog food that does not use these ingredients and instead uses whole meats that are not subject to high temperatures during processing.

Lysine amino acid structure:

L-lysine has the following chemical structure:

HO2CCH(NH2)(CH2)4NH2

The ‘L’ in L-lysine denotes that it is the levorotatory (left-handed) form of the amino acid. D-lysine is the dextrorotatory (right-handed) form.

Lysine (abbreviated as Lys or K) and has the following synonyms;

  • L-2,6-Diaminocaproic acid
  • Lysine hydrochloride
  • L-Lysine
  • Lysine acid
  • Lysine

Do dogs need Lysine amino acids?

Dogs need 11 essential amino acids that they cannot synthesize themselves and must get from their diet. Lysine is one of these 11 essential amino acids. It plays an important role in many biological functions, including the synthesis of proteins and enzymes, the absorption of calcium, and the production of hormones and antibodies.

Lysine is an essential amino acid that must be ingested into the diet. Reduce intake of food and weight loss can be hampered by a lack of lysine. Puppies may display symptoms of arginine deficiency if they receive too much lysine.

How much lysine does my dog need?

The amount of lysine your dog needs depends on its age, weight, and activity level. Puppies and growing dogs need more lysine than adult dogs. Active dogs also need more lysine than sedentary dogs.

The National Research Council (NRC) and AAFCO recommend the following daily allowances for lysine:

  • -Puppies: 2.25 g/1000kcal
  • -Adult dogs: 1.58 g/1000kcal

On a dry matter basis, the following are AAFCO recommendations for what amount of Lysine your puppy or adult needs;

  • -Puppies/growing: 0.9%
  • -Adult dogs: 0.63%

Lysine is found in meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. It is also available in supplement form.

How can I tell if my dog is getting enough lysine?

If your dog is eating a balanced, nutritious diet, then it is likely to get enough lysine. However, if you are concerned that your dog is not getting enough lysine, there are a few things you can look for.

Symptoms of lysine deficiency include:

-Growth retardation

-Poor appetite

-Muscle wasting

-Dandruff

-Lethargy

If you notice any of these symptoms in your dog, talk to your veterinarian. They can recommend a diet or supplement that will help increase your dog’s lysine intake.

How can I add more lysine to my dog’s diet?

If your dog is not getting enough lysine, there are a few ways you can increase its intake.

– Feed your dog a balanced, nutritious diet that includes plenty of protein-rich foods. Good sources of lysine include meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.

– Give your dog a lysine supplement. Lysine supplements are available in powder, tablet, and capsule form.

– Add a lysine-rich food to your dog’s diet. Some examples include Brewer’s yeast, spirulina, and wheat germ.

Main Lysine uses in dog food:

Lysine is important for many biological functions in dogs, including the synthesis of proteins and enzymes, the absorption of calcium, and the production of hormones and antibodies. For this reason, lysine is often added to dog foods as a supplement.

FAQs

Q: What is lysine?

A: Lysine is an essential amino acid that dogs need for growth and development. It plays an important role in many biological functions, including the synthesis of proteins and enzymes, the absorption of calcium, and the production of hormones and antibodies.

Q: where are amino acids made in the body?

Amino acids are made in the body by combining nitrogen with carbon, hydrogen, and other elements. Most of the amino acids used by the body are produced in this way. However, some amino acids, including lysine, must be obtained from the diet.

Q: What are the symptoms of lysine deficiency?

A: Symptoms of lysine deficiency include growth retardation, poor appetite, muscle wasting, dandruff, and lethargy. If you notice any of these symptoms in your dog, talk to your veterinarian. They can recommend a diet or supplement that will help increase your dog’s lysine intake.

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